Interesting VFR reposition flight, KJFK-KLGA

A positioning flight is a flight for the sole purpose of positioning the aircraft to conduct another flight from another airport. This is often done when the aircraft finishes its day in one city, but is needed in a different city the following day because another plane has broken down.

I came across one today featured in this video, from JFK to La Guardia. The interesting part being that they ended up having to depart VFR due to an issue with them filing their flight plan.

November 29, 2019 by Kyle Boas

Top 10 states where Air Traffic Controllers make the most money

The national average annual wage of an air traffic controller is $120,830 with the lowest being $77,150 and highest being $147,350.

Here is list of the top-10 highest-paying states for air traffic controllers, put out by Forbes based on occupational data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is each states average air traffic controller salary.

  1. New Hampshire: $147,350
  2. Virginia: $139,520
  3. Illinois: $136,390
  4. Georgia: $136,210
  5. Texas: $133,260
  6. California: $132,300
  7. Minnesota: $131,330
  8. Ohio: $131,180
  9. New York: $130,840
  10. Colorado: $128,210

References: Forbes

November 28, 2019 by Kyle Boas

Example of two aircraft remaining in the pattern

I’m going to play out a scenario. You’re controlling KSSC, Shaw AFB. Runway 04L and 04R are in use. We’re going to fly two patterns. Get out a pen and paper and draw this scenario as you follow along.

N623KB is on left crosswind for runway 04L and G-9320 is on left downwind for runway 04L. They have just taken off and are remaining in the pattern.

Controller: N623KB, number 2, traffic to follow is on left downwind
N623KB: Number 2, traffic to follow is on left downwind, N623KB
Controller: G-9320, number 1, Cleared for the option, Runway 04L
G-9320: Number 1, Cleared for the option, Runway 04L, G-9320
Controller: N623KB, number 2, Cleared for the option, Runway 04L
N623KB: Number 2, Cleared for the option, Runway 04L, N623KB

N623KB and G-9320 both do a touch and go, G-9320 is on left downwind and N623KB is upwind.

Controller: G-9320, number 1, Cleared for the option, Runway 04L
G-9320: Number 1, Cleared for the option, Runway 04L, G-9320
N623KB: N623KB, requesting change to runway 04R
Controller: N623KB, enter right downwind, Runway 04R
N623KB: Enter right downwind, Runway 04R, N623KB
Controller: N623KB, number 1, Runway 04R, Cleared for the option, after the option, make right traffic
N623KB: Number 1, Cleared for the option, Runway 04R, N623KB

Both N623KB and G-9320 are on downwind.

G-9320: G-9320, requesting change to runway 04R
Controller: G-9320, Enter left base Runway 04R, number 2, traffic to follow is on right downwind
G-9320: Enter left base runway 04R, number 2, traffic to follow is on right downwind, G-9320
Controller: G-9320, Number 2, Runway 04R, cleared for the option, after the option, make right traffic
G-9320: Number 2, Cleared for the option, Runway 04R, G-9320
N623KB: N623KB is on right downwind, full stop
Controller: Roger
G-9320: G-9320 is on left downwind, full stop
Controller: Roger

Both N623KB and G-9320 land.

That is an example of what is expected when sequencing aircraft, re-sequencing, issuing pattern entries and clearances with more then one aircraft in the pattern.

October 29, 2019 by Kyle Boas